PostScript® Expert Encoding

See also the PostScript®Standard Encoding and the PostScript®I.S.O. Latin-1 Encoding.

Yellow cells indicate inferior (subscript) characters.
Pink cells indicate superior (superscript) characters.

octal01234567
\00x        
\01x        
\02x        
\03x        
\04x !˝ $$&´
\05x,-.
\06x01234567
\07x89:;,.?
\10x ab¢de  
\11x i  lmno
\12x  rst 
\13x ^
\14x`ABCDEFG
\15xHIJKLMNO
\16xPQRSTUVW
\17xXYZ1Rp~ 
\20x        
\21x        
\22x        
\23x        
\24x ¡¢Ł  šž
\25x¨˘ˇ ˙  ¯
\26x    ˛˚
\27x¸   ¼½¾¿
\30x  
\31x¹²³
\32x
\33x¢$.,
\34xÀÁÂÃÄÅÆÇ
\35xÈÉÊËÌÍÎÏ
\36xÐÑÒÓÔŐÖŒ
\37xØÙÚÛÜÝÞŸ

Characters \044 and \060–\071 are old-style numerals, which cannot be represented in HTML.

Character \075 is a ¾-em dash, which cannot be represented in HTML. It replaces an em dash where a shorter dash is desired. The text-processing language Troff included a ¾-em dash as a common substitute for the em-dash and en-dash.

Character \174 is a fitted numeral one. Usually it does not space as widely as other digits.

Character \262 is a figure dash. Usually it spaces as widely as a digit.

Source: Adobe Systems Incorporated, PostScript Language Reference Manual, 2nd ed. (Reading, Mass., Addison-Wesley, 1990).


Col. George Sicherman [ HOME | MAIL ]